Material Handling Tip: Finding a Load’s Center of Gravity

Learn the importance of finding the center of gravity of a load along with step-by-step instructions on calculating the center of gravity (CoG) or balance point of unusually shaped loads.

In material handling, having a well-balanced pallet can often make the difference between a smooth trip from point A to point B and a costly tip over. Finding this equilibrium is fairly intuitive if you’re moving items that are uniform in shape and weight. However, what do you do when moving objects that don’t have an obvious middle?

What is the Center of Gravity of a Load?

In physics, an object’s center of gravity, center of mass, or balance point is an imaginary point where there is an equal mass on all sides. In the context of material handling, the Center of Gravity (CoG) refers to the single point of the load or object where it can be carried perfectly balanced. To look at it another way, it’s also the point at which all the load’s weight is concentrated.

Finding the Location of the Center of Gravity

While there is always the trial and error method, picking different spots and doing test lifts until you find the right location, there are shortcuts you can take to finding the center of gravity on a load without an apparent midpoint. Here are step-by-step instructions on finding the center of gravity of an object or load you need to move around the warehouse using lift scales, a tape measure, and a calculator:

1. Determine Load Weight Distribution

Determining weight distribution is where the lift scale comes into play. First, you’ll need to weigh one side of the load, then the other. This will give you the object’s left end weight (LEW), Right End Weight (REW), then combine them for the total weight of the object. The center of gravity shifts towards the heavier side, so knowing these weights is a critical step.

 2. Divide the Heaviest End by the Total Weight

You only need to calculate one side. Take the heaviest weight between LEW and REW and divide it by the total weight. The ratio of the total weight of an object with its heavy end determines the pivot point of the load. This is where the CoG resides.

3. Measure the Span of the Load

The next step is to measure the span of the load. The span is the distance between the two pick points you weighed on either side. Using a tape measure, gauge the distance between pick points and apply the ratio from the previous step to calculate where along that span, the CoG lies.

4. Practice Tests

Once you have your CoG measurement, we recommend practice tests where you try lifting the load with a jack or crane a few inches at a time to make sure it’s balanced. If it doesn’t retain its stability and starts to tip or swing, set it back down, adjust the pick point, and try again.

Example

In this example, we have a load with a LEW of 2,000 lbs, a REW of 1,000, and a total weight of 3,000 lbs. The span is 100 inches. Since the Left End Weight is greater, we divide that by the total weight of 3,000 lbs.

LEW/TW = X

2,000/3,000 = 0.67 

Now, take the span of 100 inches and multiply it by the ratio of the weights.

(LEW / TW) x 100” = CoG

(0.67) x 100” = 67”

The CoG is at the 67-inch mark for this load, closer to the heavier side.

In summation, finding the center of gravity for an irregular load can be done through trial and error. Still, some simple math and measurements can significantly reduce the time spent finding that balance.

Balancing Your Workload with Nutting

At Nutting, we engineer our products to seamlessly integrate with your existing operation with carts that can be customized with various features to accommodate different load types. Does your team produce oddly shapped parts? We can help provide a solution for your needs, all complete with a calculated center of gravity in your production prints.

Knowing which options are best for your application can save you time and money in the long run. That’s why it’s essential to consult an expert before purchasing.

Nutting has over 130 years of experience designing and manufacturing high-quality pallet carts, order picking carts, industrial carts, and more so you can be confident that you’re getting the best possible product for your needs. Contact us today to learn more about our pallet carts and how they can improve operational efficiency in your warehouse or distribution center.

How the Right Equipment Optimizes the Warehouse Process Flow

How the Right Equipment Optimizes the Warehouse Process Flow

Discover the warehouse process flow and its various stages. Learn how the right equipment, like a mother-daughter cart system or order picker carts, can help optimize warehouse operations.

Supply chain management is an essential part of the e-Commerce business process. However, when looking at optimizing the supply chain’s warehousing and distribution center links, it quickly becomes apparent that warehouse design and maximizing warehouse space can only get you so far. Eventually, you need to look at making the most of the equipment at your disposal. Adding high-quality, well-engineered equipment can make all the difference for order fulfillment and warehousing businesses of all sizes. In this article, we’ll look at the different stages of the warehouse process flow and suggest a few additions that can immediately impact your picking process.

An Example Process Flow Chart

Here is a rough flow diagram of the different processes in place for warehouse operations. You can use this as a template when organizing your warehouse system.

Warehouse Management Process

The warehouse management process flow starts with a Warehouse Management System (WMS). The WMS is a computer system or, less commonly, an analog system, responsible for warehouse inventory management, inventory tracking, and inventory control. Most computer-based WMS’ rely on SKU and barcode readers to update a database in real-time and communicate with warehouse staff through sales order updates and notifications. A functioning WMS is crucial for fulfilling customer orders and customer satisfaction.

Inbound Process

The inbound or receiving process is where the products arrive at the warehouse or distribution center. The items are processed, confirming they have arrived in suitable condition and the correct amounts, and then added as inventory to the WMS.

As items are inspected in the inbound process, placing them directly onto bins on steer carts or mother-daughter carts can reduce the need to re-sort these items later. Mother-daughter carts are especially helpful because the bins can be removed from the mother cart and placed directly into storage during the put-away process. You can learn more about mother-daughter carts later in this article.

Put-Away Process

After items have been received, the put-away process begins. During this stage, goods are moved from the receiving area to a warehouse storage location. Some operations chose to add items to the inventory at this stage. Adding items to inventory at their storage location can help improve accuracy for a WMS that tracks item specific inventory location. Identifying strategice storage locations is also critical in this step. It can help creating inefficiencies with wasted movement during the picking process.

Picking Process

The picking process is when products are gathered to fulfill customer orders. As discussed in previous articles, there are many ways to streamline this pick-up. Still, ensuring your pickers have an effective system and the proper equipment for the job is crucial during this stage of the fulfillment process. 

Creating custom order picking carts will allow your pickers to quickly and efficiently move items from their storage location to the packing location. If your warehouse often packages specific items together for orders, Nutting can help you customize a picking cart that will accommodate the right parts to reduce the need for multiple picking trips for one order.

Packing Process

The picked products are then prepared for shipping to the customer during the packing process and moved to a staging area.

If you often handle larger item orders, swivel top carts can allow packers to wrap a pallet without having to uncouple trailers or move around the carts, saving time and reducing injury risks.

Outbound Process

The outbound, or dispatching process, is where the products are ready to be shipped and must be stored until they can be loaded for transport. Organization is an integral part of this stage. Warehouses can lose efficiency if a later shipment is stored in such a way that it blocks an earlier shipment. If the same staging area is used for both loading and unloading, orders awaiting dispatch can get in the way of the receiving process and vice-versa. Late dispatches can delay loading and potentially cause late delivery. 

Shipping Process

Lastly, the shipping process is the stage where the product leaves the fulfillment center and is on to the supply chain’s following link. Shipping is most successful when an order has been properly and efficiently processed through all of the preceding stages of the warehouse process flow. o

Increase Safety, Efficiency, and Workflow

The transportation of goods in a warehouse is a crucial process that can impact the efficiency of the entire operation.

If you’re looking for a way to improve warehouse efficiency and workflow, mother-daughter cart systems may be the answer. These systems consist of two parts – a Mother Cart and a Daughter Cart – that work together to create an efficient system for moving materials.

In this system, the Daughter Cart rides within the frame of the Mother Cart, making it easy for them to trail behind a tugger train and then be dropped off at various locations for loading and unloading. In addition, multiple Mother carts can be easily attached to tuggers or AGVs (automated guided vehicles).

In a traditional warehouse setup, workers constantly move back and forth between different areas to retrieve materials or transport goods. This leads to inefficient use of time and resources and increases the chances of accidents occurring. With mother-daughter cart systems, workers can stay in one area as the carts move around them. This not only saves time but also reduces the risk of accidents.

The mother-daughter cart system is a versatile and efficient way to move inventory in a warehouse setting. Implementing a mother-daughter system reduces travel time as the tugger train can continuously move multiple daughter carts throughout the warehouse with minimal downtime. In addition, the mother-daughter cart system improves the flow of goods by allowing employees to quickly and easily load and unload items onto the carts. As a result, this system is an effective way to reduce labor costs and increase efficiency.

At Nutting, we understand that cart systems play an important role in facilities across various industries. That’s why we offer a variety of custom options to ensure that our clients can find the perfect solution for their needs. Our products have been manufactured in the USA for over 125 years, so you can rest assured that you’re receiving a high-quality product that will stand up to years of use. Whether you need a cart with a specific number of shelves or one designed to hold a particular load, we have you covered. Contact us today to learn more about our cart systems and how we can help you streamline your operation.

Ideas to Help Optimize Your Warehouse Productivity

Ideas to Help Optimize Your Warehouse Productivity

Discover ideas to help streamline your warehouse operations. Improve warehouse efficiency through your WMS, warehouse layout, proper equipment, or automation.

Whether you’re doing warehousing for your own business or running a full-scale distribution center, the bottom line at any scale for an eCommerce fulfillment center is to make sure your link in the supply chain is holding up to the strain of customer demand. Maybe you’ve been pouring over this year’s metrics or are trying to ramp up productivity for a new product line. If so, you may have been wondering what changes you can make to your warehouse operations to make things run a little more smoothly. Here are a few suggestions to get the ball rolling.

Improving Warehouse Efficiency

When looking to make your warehouse more efficient, the first place to make adjustments is with your Warehouse Management System (WMS). A WMS, or an Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system with a WMS module, handles your warehouse’s inventory management, allowing pickers to send and receive crucial information in real time through interconnected SKU or barcode scanners. Not only does this help reduce shortages due to poor inventory accuracy, but it also allows you to automate data collection of Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for future analysis.

Fulfillment

When looking at fulfillment as a KPI, you’re looking at metrics like order fill rate, order fulfillment timeliness, and picks per hour. Knowing how many orders are completed, how quickly you’re able to fulfill them, and how much time your team spends filling an order will help you identify fufillment related choke points.

Nutting Trailers can be linked together to create a tugger trailer train.
Increasing output is easy with a tugger trailer train and Nutting custom roller deck trailers.

Inventory Accuracy

Knowing what you have in your warehouse at any given moment is crucial. While it is common for a distribution center to have a disparity between what is actually on the shelves and what is recorded in the management system, it is important to implement systems that keep that disparity from getting out of hand. Allowing the difference to become too great, will result in spoilage, overstocking, or accepting orders for items that are not actually available. Regular audits of your stock against your database are highly advised. By identifying items that are regularly overstocked or understocked, you will be able to track down specific problems that are leading to unnecessary costs.

Replenishment

Replenishment is measured by how well your inventory moves from reserve storage to active picking bins. Understanding your replenishment metrics will allow you to make better, more efficient decisions about what inventory to replace and when to replace it. For example, If space is limited, you can  improve efficiency by prioritizing stock with a higher replenishment profit.

Order Accuracy

Increasing the order accuracy of your warehouse to nearly 100% is an important benchmark to reach. After all, ensuring the customer receives what they ordered is the baseline target for any fulfillment center.

Dead Stock

Dead stock is an often overlooked efficiency killer.  If you streamline your warehouse operations but fail to purge products that have become damaged or otherwise unsellable, also known as dead stock, your facility is paying to store items that will never provide revenue. Therefore, keeping track of dead inventory and finding low cost methods of moving it, is a must. Ikea uses one of our favorite creative ways of moving dead stock, they have created a yard sale space where customers can purchase individual parts of broken items for do-it-yourself type projects. Before paying a trash removal company to dispose of dead stock, consider ways to create incentives for customers or community members to help you reduce costs.

Warehouse Layout

The way your available space is laid out can significantly affect order-picking productivity. This will vary depending on the type of warehouse you’re operating, but in all cases, minimizing your pickers’ travel time with a good slotting strategy will have a positive outcome for order fulfillment and workflow. Additionally, equipment such as ergonomic order-picking carts and picker platforms that attach to forklifts help maximize the amount of product gathered in a single trip and the potential of vertical space. Pallet carts that train together can also be an effective way of moving multiple orders at once.

If your warehouse includes a manufacturing or assembly component, ensuring that workstations are organized and close to the storage space of necessary materials can save your workers time during set up and put away.

Is Automation a Necessity?

Warehouse technology continues to grow and improve. It used to be that pallet racks and forklifts were the only option available for material handling. However, automation has advanced the picking process with robotic warehouse workers and conveyors, minimizing downtime and creating cost savings for the right warehouse operation. With that being said, the initial investment and the restrictions required by the automated pickers can make the pricing of these advancements prohibitive.

Before investing in technological process improvements like automation, it’s a good idea to consider some alternative ways you could improve the efficiency of your warehouse with add-ons for the equipment you already have. If automation is the route your business needs to go, Nutting Carts and Trailers can manufacture custom carts, trailers, or stands to operate with your autonomous platform of choice.

A Custom Nutting Platform used with Fetch Robotics CartConnect500
Nutting Carts and Trailers can manufacture a custom solution for your autonomous needs.

Making the Right Choice For Your Warehouse

Let the experts at Nutting help you decide what warehousing equipment is right for you! Choosing the right trailer for your warehouse space can be a daunting task. However, by considering the needs of your unique warehouse, you can make the decision easier.

Nutting offers several solutions, like our Caster steer trailers. These trailers can be fitted with a variety of customizations, such as lift gates and shelving, to make them even more wellsuited to your operation. Whatever your needs, the Nutting sales and engineering team can help you customize a trailer or cart to fit your facility.

The way your available space is laid out can significantly affect order-picking productivity. This will vary depending on the type of warehouse you’re operating, but in all cases, minimizing your pickers’ travel time with a good slotting strategy will have a positive outcome for order fulfillment and workflow. Additionally, equipment such as ergonomic order-picking carts and picker platforms that attach to forklifts help maximize the amount of product gathered in a single trip and the potential of vertical space. Pallet carts that train together can also be an effective way of moving multiple orders at once.

If your warehouse includes a manufacturing or assembly component, ensuring that workstations are organized and close to the storage space of necessary materials can save your workers time during set up and put away.

Is Automation a Necessity?

Warehouse technology continues to grow and improve. It used to be that pallet racks and forklifts were the only option available for material handling. However, automation has advanced the picking process with robotic warehouse workers and conveyors, minimizing downtime and creating cost savings for the right warehouse operation. However, the initial investment and the restrictions required by the automated pickers can make the pricing of these advancements prohibitive.

Before investing in technological process improvements like automation, it’s a good idea to consider some alternative ways you could improve the efficiency of your warehouse with add-ons for the equipment you already have.

Making the Right Choice For Your Warehouse

Let the experts at Nutting help you decide what warehousing equipment is right for you! Choosing the right trailer for your warehouse space can be a daunting task. However, by considering the needs of your unique warehouse, you can make the decision easier.

Nutting offers several solutions, like our Caster steer trailers. These trailers can be fitted with a variety of customizations, such as lift gates and shelving, to make them even more wellsuited to your operation. Whatever your needs, the Nutting sales and engineering team can help you customize a trailer or cart to fit your facility.

Productivity Freedom with the Nutting Adjustable Shelf Cart

Take your productivity to the next level with Nutting Adjustable Shelf Trailers. The adjustable shelves make transporting and managing materials easier than ever before. With various sizes and capacities to choose from, you have total control of customization for any size product or load. You can quickly and intuitively adjust your shelf height as needed to maximize efficiency.

The shelves eliminate the need for stacking products so you never have to worry about running into limitations — you can get the job done faster, while avoiding injury risks associated with manual handling of heavy goods. Plus, they’re lightweight yet durable enough to handle long-term use in even the toughest working environments.

This featured product is set up with fifth wheel steering, but is available in many different steering options. 

Customizable options include:

  • Dimensions
  • Capacity
  • Deck material
  • Casters/wheels

Don’t let your workflow slow down; speed it up with Nutting Shelf Trailers. Reach out today to learn more about how we can meet your needs!

Building an Efficient Warehouse Order Picking System

Learn different warehouse-picking processes, from zone picking to automation, that increase the efficiency of your warehouse’s order fulfillment method.

It doesn’t matter what link you are in the supply chain; developing and maintaining an efficient Warehouse Management System (WMS) to meet the increasing demands eCommerce has placed on customer order fulfillment is crucial. This article will focus on ways you can improve the efficiency and safety of your warehouse or distribution center.

Order Picking Methods

First, let’s look at standard methods used in the order-picking process.

Zone Picking

In zone picking, each picker covers a different zone in the warehouse and pulls items for orders which fall within the pick zone. In this fashion, zone picking for large orders can resemble an assembly line where each zone picker manages only a portion of the total order as they pick and pass goods and materials. This can allow for more efficient picking as it reduces walking time, no matter the number of orders.

Batch Picking

Batch picking, sometimes called cluster picking, is an order-picking strategy that involves one picker gathering items that have been organized into groups or batches based on their SKUs. For example, items can be grouped into pick locations based on their popularity or likelihood to be in the same order based on trends.

Wave Picking

Wave picking is a process in which each order received by the warehouse is broken down into line items and then organized to maximize shipping and picking operations by matching it with other charges. Then, a single picker can collect similar orders in a single wave, reducing picking time.

Discrete Picking

 

Discrete order picking is usually used in small warehouses or for less complex orders. It consists of one worker picking items for a single charge. While this methodology is more time-consuming and labor-intensive, it minimizes the number of hands as an order is picked without additional sorts. This can result in greater order accuracy and fewer picking errors.

 

Automation and Other Tools as Part of Your Picking Strategy

Nutting manufactures carts and trailers that are compatible with AMR and AGV systems

Mobile Robots

For large warehouse operations and distribution centers, it may become beneficial, profitability-wise, to add a measure of automation. While systems using mobile robots, automatic pickers, and conveyor systems require specific warehouse layouts, they can significantly increase efficiency under high-volume warehousing conditions.

Barcode Scanners

While barcode scanners have been used for inventory tracking for quite a while, the technology continues to evolve and improve. The best barcode scanners can reduce the possibility of human error by helping your system track and analyze inventory while ensuring the right picking is happening. Most even have the bonus of showing their user the actual inventory location.

Voice Picking Equipment

Voice picking is a warehouse picking process where the pick list is hands-free. The pickers receive real-time instruction through a headset and microphone attached to a wearable device. Many of these systems include feedback functionality where the pickers can send vital information back to the inventory management system.

Pallet Carts

 

Whether you use manual pallet jacks or a fleet of forklifts, adding pallet carts to your picking strategy can be a game changer. Pallet carts are a safe and efficient way to move pallets around a facility with or without using a forklift. Nutting offers both single-pallet and double-pallet carts, as well as customizable options to suit the specific needs of your operation. Our pallet carts are built with safety in mind, and our team of experts can help you select the suitable model for your facility.

Order Picker Platforms 

 

In particular, the Nutting order picker platforms, in particular, are secure, stable surfaces that operators can use to transport products within a facility. These platforms are attached to order pickers via an optional clamping mechanism and can be lifted to the desired level using the picker’s lifting mechanism. This allows operators to easily maneuver the platform alongside storage racks and transfer products to carts or other storage areas.

Enclosed Order Picker Platform with Shelves by Nutting Carts and Trailers
Custom Swivel Pallet Trailer by Nutting Carts and Trailers

 

Nutting has the Right Tools for Your Picking Operation.

Whether you’re looking to streamline your order fulfillment process, lower operating costs, reduce travel time for your pickers, maximize customer satisfaction, or increase equipment functionality, Nutting has you covered. The Nutting order picker platform is the perfect way to quickly and easily pick and load materials from warehouse racks. This forklift accessory makes your picking and delivery operations more efficient. Order picker platforms are available in various sizes and configurations to meet your needs.

The benefits of choosing Nutting’s order picking platforms include the following:

  • Increase operator safety and productivity

  • Reduce product damage

  • Improve facility efficiency

  • Fully customizable to meet your specific needs

Allow Nutting to help improve efficiency and ergonomics in your facility. Be part of an innovative material handling solution. Contact us today

How to Move Pallets Manually Without Using a Forklift

How to Move Pallets Manually Without Using a Forklift

Manual pallet jacks, stackers, and carts are a safe and easy way to move pallet loads and heavy objects without a forklift. Learn which is ideal for you.

An efficient and safe warehousing operation is key to the success of your business. Pallet jacks (also called hand trucks, pallet trucks, pallet dollies, or jack lifts), working in conjunction with pallet stackers and pallet carts, are a safe and efficient way to move pallets around a facility without using a forklift.

These systems offer various customization options to suit your specific needs while reducing the time spent moving pallets around. However, not all work sites are created equal. Read on for a breakdown of which type of system is ideal for your warehousing challenges.

The tools you need to move pallets without a forklift

To begin, here are the tools required to move pallets in systems where no forklift is needed.

Pallet Jacks

A manual pallet jack is a pallet loader that can be operated by hand. It typically consists of a handle with a control lever attached to a hydraulic pump that drives the forks. The forks are two prongs with rollers that slide into the pallets. At this point, the operator ratchets the handle up and down to lift the pallet off the ground. It can then be safely pushed or pulled to the desired location. Electric pallet jacks work the same way with the addition of a battery-powered engine to hoist the pallet. The operator can then move the load similarly to the manual pallet jack.

Pallet jacks can move (but not stack) one or two pallets at a time with a single operator.

Pallet Stackers

‘Walkie’ or pallet stackers are functionally walk-behind forklifts. They use motors or hand-operated hydraulics to lift and stack heavy pallets. Stackers have a mast with prongs that raise their loads to the desired height. While most have wheels, they are not equipped to move material loads around the warehouse more than short distances.

Pallet Carts

Towable pallet carts are exactly what they sound like: heavy-duty material handling carts designed to hold industrial pallets, usually with corner railings to hold the pallets in place. In addition, these carts can be connected to form a rail-less train system that can then be towed either by a motorized tug or manually. Using a stacker, multiple pallets can be placed on carts enabling a greater number of pallets to be moved around the warehouse simultaneously.

Pallet carts are customizable to accommodate single or double pallet loads, engineered to seamlessly integrate with your existing warehouse operation. 

 

When You Need a Forklift and When You Don’t

While forklift trucks are a powerful tool for moving heavy objects, they aren’t always necessary. There are many situations where a pallet jack is a better solution. Knowing which options are best for your application can save you time and money in the long run. That’s why it’s essential to consult an expert before purchasing.

You may need a forklift if:

  • You are operating on uneven terrain like a construction site. Manual pallet jacks require a smooth surface to function safely.

  • You need maximum height and load capacity. Forklifts can handle heavier pallet loads, moving more materials at one time.

  • Your forklift operators work for an extended period. Since the driver can sit, fatigue is less of an issue.

  • You need a heavy-duty stacker to raise pallets into place or lift workers to carry out overhead tasks.

You may not need a forklift if:

  • You have limited space to maneuver in your warehouse. Jack and cart systems can fit into aisles that no forklift can.

  • Your shipping operation uses a loading dock truck drivers can pull up to or trucks with liftgates.

  • You need an affordable, durable, easy-to-handle pallet-moving option. New forklifts can cost anywhere from $20,000-$50,000.

  • You have limited storage space. You can store pallet jacks, stackers, and carts in small spaces, while forklifts take up more space and require recharging or refueling stations within the facility.

Nutting Pallet Carts Improve Your Warehouse’s Efficiency and Safety

Using forklifts to move heavy loads around your warehouse or distribution center can be dangerous and time-consuming. That’s where our pallet carts come in. Nutting offers both single-pallet and double-pallet carts, as well as customizable options to suit the specific needs of your operation. Our pallet carts are built with safety, ergonomics, and OSHA regulations in mind. Our team of experts can help you select the suitable model for your facility and material handling needs. 

Engineered to integrate with your existing operation seamlessly, our carts can be customized with various features to accommodate different types of loads.

Nutting has over 100 years of experience designing and manufacturing high-quality pallet carts, so you can be confident that you’re getting the best possible product for your needs. Contact us today to learn more about our pallet carts and how they can improve operational efficiency in your warehouse or distribution center.

Pallet Carts – The Safe, Efficient Solution for Moving Pallets in Your Facility

At Nutting, we understand that an efficient and safe warehouse operation is key to the success of your business. Nutting Carts and Trailers manufactures pallet carts for warehouses and distribution centers. Pallet carts are a safe and efficient way to move pallets around a facility without using a forklift. Nutting offers both single pallet and double pallet carts, as well as customizable options to suit the specific needs of your operation. Our pallet carts are built with safety in mind, and our team of experts can help you select the suitable model for your facility. 

Some of the key features of our pallet carts include:

  • Customizable to accommodate single or double pallet loads
  • Engineered to seamlessly integrate with your existing warehouse operation
  • Various customization options available to suit your specific needs
  • Improves efficiency and safety while reducing the amount of time spent moving pallets around

How Nutting Pallet Carts Can Improve Your Warehouse’s
Efficiency and Safety

Using forklifts to move heavy loads of pallets around your warehouse or distribution center can be both dangerous and time-consuming. That’s where our pallet carts come in. Nutting pallet carts offer a variety of features that make them the perfect solution for safely and efficiently moving pallets around your warehouse or distribution center.

These options include the type of casters and wheels, steering options, deck type, shelving, and more. Pallet carts are commonly manufactured in the following product categories:

Nutting Pallet Cart with Foot Break and Push Handle - Z52-001-877

Engineered to seamlessly integrate with your existing operation, our carts can be customized with various features to accommodate different types of loads.

Knowing which options are best for your application can save you time and money in the long run. That’s why it’s essential to consult an expert before purchasing.

Nutting has over 100 years of experience designing and manufacturing high-quality pallet carts, so you can be confident that you’re getting the best possible product for your needs. Contact us today to learn more about our pallet carts and how they can improve operational efficiency in your warehouse or distribution center.

The Best Material Handling Equipment For Your Warehouse Space

Learn the factors to consider when choosing the best material handling equipment to fit your warehouse layout and needs, from hand trucks to mobile robots.

Undoubtedly, e-commerce has exploded recently, leaving the supply chain struggling to keep up with the increased demand. As a result, warehousing and distribution centers have become more important than ever as vast amounts of goods are stored, inventoried, packed, and shipped worldwide.

However, not every warehouse is a shipping hub, and many materials require specialized care leaving no one-size-fits-all solution for bulk material handling equipment. This article explores solutions for different Warehouse Management Systems (WMS) to ensure proper material handling.

Inventory Management and Storage

Before a decision can be made on the optimization of warehouse storage equipment, some factors must be considered:

Warehouse Layout and Business Needs

The space utilization of a warehouse is crucial to determining the material handling equipment. Confined warehouse space with narrow aisles and limited floor space will favor maneuverability. A facility moving materials from large silos through hoppers, conveyor belts, or even grain elevators would require heavier-duty equipment. An order fulfillment facility may only be able to meet demand using automatic guided vehicles.

Your Unit Load

A load you can store or move as a single entity is called a unit load. This can include a container, tote, or pallet. Knowing the size, shape, and weight of a typical unit load is critical in determining the types of material handling equipment required.

Types of Material Handling Equipment

Hand-Operated

Hand-operated carts, like hand trucks, dollies, pallet jacks, and A-Frame carts, offer increased mobility in tight spaces, more accessible transportation of goods, and reduced manual labor. All of which leads to increased efficiency. Most hand-operated material handlers are designed to be easily maneuvered by just one person, reducing the amount of manual labor required.

Hand Trucks are perfect for various applications, including order picking, workstation and assembly cell replenishment, lean manufacturing, and other material handling requirements. Most modern hand trucks are built with ergonomics and safety in mind. When maneuvering the cart correctly, the warehouse staff can safely transport materials and stay free from injury.

Pallet Jacks or pallet trucks are cousins of dollies, hand trucks, and forklifts, designed with parallel forks so a single person can move pallets. They can feature a manual pump system similar to a car jack to lift the pallets, or they can have an electric lift system.

A-Frame Carts are designed to move large quantities of long, flat materials such as glass windows, door frames, partitions, and sheet stock and can be loaded from either side, offering versatility. In addition, they can carry heavier loads than a conventional hand truck or dolly, making them ideal for moving large, heavy objects such as metal security doors or sheets of plywood. 

Machine Operated

This category will include all industrial trucks, such as forklifts and side loaders. While these machines require more space to maneuver, they can handle larger, heavier loads than a hand-operated cart.

Forklifts or lift trucks are a valuable staple of many warehouse settings. While they are primarily designed to load pallet racks, you can further increase the utility of forklifts by adding attachable trailers that can also be loaded with materials. This turns the forklift into a train engine of sorts.

Side Loaders are a type of forklift designed to pick up longer items or fit narrow aisles. As their name suggests, they can be loaded from several different directions as opposed to a standard forklift that must load directly in front.

Order Pickers are another type of lifting device, but in this case, they raise a platform to the various levels of a pallet rack so that a human order picker can load the platform with the needed materials.

Automated Material Handling Systems

Automated storage and retrieval systems are engineered systems that include Automated Guided Vehicles (AGVs) or Autonomous Mobile Robots (AMRs) working with conveyor systems. Although robotic delivery systems speed up the material handling process, automated equipment often has special requirements for the system to function correctly. While ideal for high-volume order fulfillment distribution centers, they require custom storage racks and a computer management system. In addition, AGVs need flooring that meets specific flatness, levelness, and curvature standards.

Choosing Warehouse Material Handling Equipment to Optimize Each Unit Load

Nutting Carts and Trailers takes the time to understand your specific warehouse operation to engineer and manufacture a product that meets those needs. Nutting has you covered whether you need a custom industrial cart or trailer with particular features or want a standard model with a few modifications. All our products are made in the USA using high-quality materials and components, backed by a comprehensive warranty, ensuring that you can count on them to perform reliably for years to come.


How to Determine Your Forklift’s Load Capacity | Nutting by ACCO

Before you start your search for the right forklift attachments or accessories, it’s important that you understand some of the finer specifications of your machinery. Knowing how to determine your forklift capacity isn’t as simple as looking at the data plate, also known as the capacity plate, on your forklift. You need to know and understand the load dimensions, placement, and distribution. 

How to Calculate Load Capacity

The lifting capacity of your forklift – sometimes also called load, net, or rated capacity – is a measure of the weight that the forklift can raise safely at a given load center. The rated capacity of your forklift is located on the data plate for your lift and can range from 3000 pounds to over 70000. It’s important to note that the forklift’s rated capacity is not always the same as maximum capacity – there are other considerations to bear in mind when figuring out if your machine can handle a given load’s weight.

Forklift capacity is closely related to the load center, which is the horizontal distance from the fork’s vertical face to the center of gravity for the load (your forklift data plate may feature a capacity chart that takes this into consideration).

You can calculate your lift truck’s capacity (and that of any forklift attachments) by figuring out the maximum load moment. A simple way to determine your forklift’s maximum load moment is to multiply its weight rating by the center load distance. For example, a 4000 lb capacity multiplied by a 24-inch load center would give you a maximum load moment of 96,000 inch-pounds.

The Dangers of Exceeding Maximum Weight Capacity

In addition to the warnings and specifications from the manufacturer, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration is very specific about how forklift operators should handle weight capacity. OSHA regulation 1910.178(o)(2) states “only loads within the rated capacity of a truck shall be handled”, but as we have seen, rated capacity isn’t the same as maximum weight capacity, and misunderstanding your forklift load capacity can result in forklift accidents like tip-overs, loss of control, spilled loads, damage to your forklift or other equipment, and fines from OSHA. Forklift safety isn’t just the law, it’s good business practice, so getting the carrying capacity of your forklift right is essential.

Attachments Can Improve Capacity

Often a particular load will have an irregular size, shape, or weight that makes normal forklift operations unsafe. Forklift attachments like pallet handlers, side shifters, layer pickers, trail skids, and clamps can help. They can adjust the weight distribution, load center distance, and lifting capacity of your forklift. The right attachment can simplify the day-to-day work of material handling while saving you from buying multiple forklifts. 

For example, our trail skids have the ability to double, or even triple, your forklift’s load capacity. Trail skids work by redistributing some of the load weight from the forklift’s front wheels to the roller/wheels on the far end of the skid.

In order to make sure our equipment works safely and effectively with your forklift we can customize the skid’s dimensions, capacity, deck material, and superstructures.

As always, we advise you to make sure that your forklift operators are properly trained in the use of the given attachment and have access to all of the information they need.

What Forklift Capacity Do You Need?

Now that you understand the finer points of a forklift’s load center, you can start to think about how much capacity you need and what sorts of attachments you can or should add. This is going to depend on the needs of your business, but important considerations are things like: the average amount of weight you need to move, the average lift height those loads need to reach, and how long or wide those loads are going to be.

If you take the time to fully understand the capacity of a forklift before investing in additional machinery or tools, you’re more likely to avoid forklift accidents, set your forklift operators up for success, and get the most out of your machinery.

 

Not sure which attachments are right for your needs? Contact us and we can help you figure out what kinds of forklift accessories are right for your warehouse.

How Mother Daughter Carts Help Warehouse Productivity

The Perfect Solution to Increase Your Safety, Efficiency, and Workflow

The transportation of goods in a warehouse is a crucial process that can impact the efficiency of the entire operation. If you’re looking for a way to improve warehouse efficiency and workflow, mother-daughter cart systems may be the answer. These systems consist of two parts – a Mother Cart and a Daughter Cart – that work together to create an efficient system for moving materials.

In this system, the Daughter Cart rides within the frame of the Mother Cart, making it easy for them to trail behind a tugger train and then be dropped off at various locations for loading and unloading.  Multiple Mother carts can be easily attached to tuggers or AGVs (automated guided vehicles) and offer a variety of benefits that will help take your business to the next level.

In a traditional warehouse setup, workers would have to constantly move back and forth between different areas to retrieve materials or transport goods. This not only leads to inefficient use of time and resources but also increases the chances of accidents occurring. With mother-daughter cart systems, workers can stay in one area as the carts move around them. This not only saves time but also reduces the risk of accidents.

The mother-daughter cart system is a versatile and efficient way to move inventory in a warehouse setting. Implementing a mother-daughter system allows for a reduction in travel time as the tugger train can continuously move multiple daughter carts throughout the warehouse with minimal downtime. In addition, the mother-daughter cart system improves the flow of goods by allowing employees to quickly and easily load and unload items onto the carts. As a result, this system is an effective way to reduce labor costs and increase efficiency in a warehouse setting.

At Nutting, we understand that mother-daughter cart systems play an important role in facilities across a wide range of industries. That’s why we offer a variety of custom options to ensure that our clients can find the perfect solution for their needs. All of our products are made and manufactured in the USA for over 125 years, so you can rest assured that you’re receiving a high-quality product that will stand up to years of use. Whether you need a cart with a specific number of shelves or one that is designed to hold a certain type of load, we have you covered. Contact us today to learn more about our mother-daughter cart systems and how we can help you streamline your operation.     

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